Do you italicize foreign phrases?

In broad terms, unfamiliar foreign words or phrases should be italicized in English writing. This is common when referring to technical terms used by non-English writers. For instance: … By comparison, there is no need to italicize foreign words or phrases that have an established use in English.

Do you italicize foreign phrases in legal writing?

According to The Bluebook A Uniform System of Citation, foreign words and phrases that are used often in legal writing and are familiar to the legal community are not italicized, but foreign words and phrases that are very long, obsolete, or uncommon Latin, should be italicized.

Do you put foreign words in quotations?

If you are writing a news-centric piece or are an independent journalist without a house style guide, follow the guideline from The Associated Press Stylebook (AP style): Use quotation marks around foreign words that aren’t “understood universally.” In addition to the quotation marks, AP style also recommends …

Why do people italicize foreign words?

The practice of italicizing such words is a form of linguistic gatekeeping; a demarcation between “exotic” words and those that have a rightful place in the text. “Masala” is a word found in the dictionary that comes with my laptop, but not “nasi goreng” (“fried rice” in Indonesian).

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Are Latin phrases italicized MLA?

The MLA (7th ed.) points out three common Latin abbreviations that are never italicized: “e.g.,” “et al.” and “etc.” However, when spelled in full, they are italicized. For example: “e.g.” but “exempli gratia.”

Is The Great Gatsby underlined or italicized?

In most cases, you should italicize the titles of complete works, like books: The Great Gatsby, Beloved, and The Catcher in the Rye. You would also italicize the names of feature-length films, like Rocky, Schindler’s List, and Frozen.

Is pro se italicized?

But no italics for Anglicized (in other words, familiar) Latin terms like certiorari, per se, pro se, and status quo.

Are Latin phrases italicized?

Latin words should usually be printed in italics (e.g. ex ante), but certain common Latin phrases take roman (refer to the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors for italic or roman style). Latin phrases are not hyphenated when used adjectivally, e.g. ad hoc meeting.

Do you italicize foreign words in Chicago?

Foreign Words

[7.49] Italics are used for isolated words and phrases in a foreign language if they are likely to be unfamiliar to readers. If a foreign word becomes familiar through repeated use throughout a work, it need be italicized only on its first occurrence.

How do you write foreign words in a research paper?

When you are using only a word or two of a foreign language and are not directly quoting it, the word or phrase can simply be placed in italic font, with an excellent example being the Latin nomenclature for genera and species, such as the name for the common herb thyme: Thymus vulgaris (in italics here, though they …

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Do you not italicize foreign words?

Whether or not to italicize foreign words depends upon the word’s familiarity to the intended audience, the context in which the word appears, and the frequency with which the word appears in a given text. In American usage, if a foreign word has an entry in Merriam-Webster, it need not be italicized.

Should inter alia be italicized?

Common Latin (or other) abbreviations or words should not be italicized, including cf., e.g., ad hoc, i.e., per se, inter alia, vis-à-vis and de facto.

Do you italicize sayings?

Italics can be used when you want to emphasize a certain word or phrase in a sentence in informal writing. This would not be appropriate for academic writing, but is common in many other types of writing.

Is et al always italicized?

Latin and italics: “et al.” is not italicized or underlined (van Leunen, p. 27: “Write it without either underlining or italics.”; Chicago Manual of Style 7.56: “Commonly used Latin words and abbreviations should not be italicized.

Is vitro always italicized?

For example, the ACS style guide states that common Latin terms and abbreviations such as ab initio, et al, in situ, in vitro, and in vivo should not be italicized; however, italicization should be used when referring to genus, species, subspecies, and genotypes.

Is de novo italicized?

Because this is a Latin phrase, it is often italicized when written (i.e., de novo). In law, de novo is the most rigorous of the three standards by which common law court decisions are reviewed on appeal; the other two are clear error and abuse of discretion.

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